HARUYAMA Tetsugen

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HARUYAMA TetsugenProfessor

HARUYAMA Tetsugen

E-mail

URL

https://t-haruyama.github.io/

TEL/FAX

TEL : 078-803-6807  FAX : 078-803-6807

Research Interest

Economic Growth, Technical Progress

GDP per capita is a measure of the standard of living in a counry, and its propotionate increase is an economic growth rate. If real GDP per capita is 100 today and grows at 2 per cent per year, it increases by a factor 7 to about 725 after 100 years. In the case of 3 per cent growth rate, it rises to 1922, which is 19 times as high as the starting level. This simple calculation indicates that a small difference in growth rate matters a lot. Figure 1 shows the distribuion of average growth rates of 123 countries in 1951-2017 (Japan grew at 4.4 per cent), and the difference between the max and the min is 8.05 per cent. It is not difficult to imagine that income indequality would increase if the trend is extrapolated to the fugure. Then, what causes such a small difference in growth rates? What is a mechanism behind it? These are the questions which are closely related to my research. In particular, I am interested in the role of technical progress as an engine of growth.

 

graph(prof.haruyama)ENG20181018

Lectures and Seminars

Lectures (Undergraduate)

「中級マクロ経済学I」
This is an intermediate level macroeconomics course. Unlike microeconomics which consiers decisions of consumers and firms, macroeconomics explores how an economy itself works as a whole. For example, inflation and unemployment, which have economy-wide impacts. Other examples include economic growth (which is my research topic) and monetary policy of a central bank (the Bank of Japan here in Japan). In lectures, PowerPoint slides are used, which are useful to show figures and data. In case of simple equations being used, intuitions are provided as much as possible. This is a core course for undergraduate students.

「IFEEK特別演習IIA」
This is a small-size exercise-based course in English. The main purpose is to provide an opportunity for students to prepare for tutorial classes in foreign universities. Students are expected to solve questions on microeconomics in advance and are strongly encouraged to actively participate in class discussion. Learning objectives are the following. By the end of the course, students will be able to
(1) explain answers to exercise questions on microeconomics at an intermediate level in English;
(2) use microeconomics terms in English;
(3) describe/explain diagrams and equations in English.
This course is compulsory for students in the IFEEK programme.

「IFEEK特別演習IIB」
This is a small-size exercise-based course in English. The main purpose is to provide an opportunity for students to prepare for tutorial classes in foreign universities. Students are expected to solve questions on macroeconomics in advance and are strongly encouraged to actively participate in class discussion. Learning objectives are the following. By the end of the course, students will be able to
(1) explain answers to exercise questions on macroeconomics at an intermediate level in English;
(2) use macroeconomics terms in English;
(3) describe/explain diagrams and equations in English.
This course is compulsory for students in the IFEEK programme.

 

Lectures (Graduate)

「Topics in Macroeconomics」
This is a course on a selection of macroeconomic issues and offered in English. Why are some countries richer than others? Why are growth rates different across countries? These are important questions in macroeconomics and will be explored in the course. In lectures, a series of theoretical models are developed, starting from basic growth models to more sophisticated ones with an emphasis on the role technical progress, which interacts with physical and human capital accumulation, institutions, education and others.

 

Seminars (Undergraduate)

There are three main objectives.
(1) To improve English speaking ability through presentations and Q&A sessions on economic issues. Speaking ability is widely considered to be important, and at the same time, is often said to be more difficult to acquire than reading, writing and listening. This class offers an opportunity for students to practice speaking through 5-minute presentations. Students will be advised on pronunciation and ways of speaking, if necessary.
(2) To learn basics of Python. Student will learn how to write basic codes using Python, which is a general-purpose programming language. One objective is to conduct a simple empirical project using Python. English resources (e.g., datacamp.com) will be used.
(3) To write a disseration (forth-year students)
Students will write a graduation disseration on a topic they choose. If empirical estimation is included, students are expected to use Python.

 

Seminars (Graduate)

Major Topics: Economic growth and macroeconomic dynamics
Minor Topics: Technical progress, international trade
Students are expected to work on the above topics and related areas in master and PhD theses. In class, students make presentations on textbooks and resarch papers, and are expected to read them in advance. Topics other than those mentioned above can also be considered. Given that theoretical approach is emphasized, students are strongly encouraged to take Macroeconomics IA and IB and Microeconomics IA and IB. Japanese and English both are used.

 

Education and Positions
  • BSc Honors (Economics), University of Warwick
  • M.Phil. (Economics), University of Oxford
  • D.Phil. (Economics), University of Oxford
  • Senior Lecturer/Lecturer, Department of Economics, University of Glasgow
  • Professor, Graduate School of Economics, Kobe University
Main Publications
  1. "Technological Progress and Unemployment: An Efficiency Wage Perspective," (with Campbell Leith), Japanese Economic Review, forthcoming.
  2. "R&D Policy in a Volatile Economy," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, 2009 (October), vol.33, issue 10, pp.1761-1778.
  3. "Competitive Innovation with Codified and Tacit Knowledge," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, 2009 (September), vol.56, issue 4, pp.390-414.
  4. "Do Distortionary Taxes Always Harm Growth?" (with Jun-ichi Itaya), Journal of Economics, 2006 (March), vol.87, number 2, pp.99-126.
  5. "Political Uncertainty, Public Expenditure and Growth," (with Julia Darby and Anton Muscatelli), European Journal of Political Economy, 2004 (March), vol.20, issue 1, pp.153-179.
  6. "Endogenous Growth without Scale Effects: A Comment," American Economic Review, 2003 (June), vol.93, pp.1009-1018.
Message

"The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of thinking." John Kenneth Galbraith (economist, 1908 - 2006)

 

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